At Kames we study and analyse financial accounts as part of our wide due diligence work when deciding whether to lend our client money to a particular corporate entity or not. While this process is quantitative in nature, our process also encapsulates a more qualitative approach, one that relies on the wealth of experience we have in our high yield team – particularly in instances where something just doesn’t feel quite right. 

While we are paid to view things cynically, one corporate finance decision that caught my eye this week was the refinancing by French telecommunications operator SFR of their 2022 maturity debt. For anyone that follows the European telecommunications sector they will know that SFR has had operational challenges that it is still addressing (in the year to May 2018 the share price of parent company Altice fell 65%, before showing early signs of an operational turnaround in their Q1 results released in the middle of the month). What is particularly striking about this deal is that the bonds being refinanced don’t fall due for another 4 years (2022); the company is having to pay up to take them out (a call premium of 3pts above par); and meanwhile the company is locking in a higher cost of debt (over 2% above the existing coupon on the bonds).

In situations like this we ask ourselves questions such as: “if management truly believe in an operational turnaround, then why not wait another 12 to 18 months, leaving plenty of time to refinance at a presumably much lower cost of debt?” To us, the answer is not clear and serves as a potential warning sign. Time will tell if we are being too cynical with SFR or not, but it certainly serves as a red flag – one we are happy to avoid.

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