Climate change and general concern for the environment, they’re an ever-increasingly important issue for society, so why would it be any different for investors? It isn’t. This is something we’ve been watching for a long time; our ethical franchise will have been running for 30 years next year, so it’s something deeply engrained in our processes.

Lately, plastics and the pollution they cause have faced increasing scrutiny and regulation. This backlash has a fundamental impact on companies in the high yield universe. Take the metal can specialist, Crown Holdings. They suggest that the aluminium can is the world’s most recycled beverage container… and actually it is estimated that 75% of all aluminium ever produced is still in use today. Crown believe that a 1% shift from plastic bottles to metal cans for soft drinks alone could increase demand by billions of cans. This could be an impressive tailwind for positions that produce metal cans – companies like Ball Corp, Crown and Ardagh.

But for every winner, there’s a loser. Klöckner Pentaplast is one of the world’s largest producers of plastic films. This company makes the rigid plastics that cover your food, wraps around batteries, surround gift cards and the packs that your painkillers come in. As such, Klöckner is highly exposed to plastic packaging regulation (and backlash). While regulation isn’t the only problem that this company faces, it certainly hasn’t helped. Operating performance has been deteriorating, with limited revenue growth, falling earnings and negative free cash flow. To its credit, Klöckner has been trying to use more sustainable raw materials, focusing on recycled plastic. But so has everyone else, and the cost of recycled PET has been rising in response – compounding the problem.

Something else that’s interesting about Klöckner Pentaplast is how it has structured its debt. The company has issued a type of bond known as a Toggle PIK. These allow the company to pay interest in cash (like normal) or to elect to ‘pay in kind’ (this means adding more debt to its existing debt!). This toggle option means the company isn’t forced to pay cash away when it can’t afford to. But this extra debt means that the company is becoming increasingly indebted – even as it struggles to pay its existing obligations! This risk means that PIK bonds often come with large coupons, and can be an excellent investment when the business is doing well. This is where stock selection is so important.

We decided not to participate in the Klöckner bond when it was first issued at par (i.e. 100) this time last year. I reviewed the company when the bond was trading in the 50s last month, having lost almost half of its value. We chose to pass again, as the firm’s fundamentals had continued to deteriorate. This week, Klöckner announced it would elect to pay its interest in PIK. Today, the bonds are priced at 35. I can hear the Klöck ticking…

Meanwhile, our can makers in the portfolio continue to hold in very well amidst the recent market volatility. These are fundamentally strong businesses that may also benefit from a helpful regulatory tailwind.

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